New AGHLS-publication!

AGHLS research reveals relationship between the intake of sugar-containing beverages during adolescence and adult weight status in Public Health Nutrition Journal:

Is the intake of sugar-containing beverages during adolescence related to adult weight status?

Objective: To investigate the relationship between the intake of sugar-containing beverages (SCB) at the age of 13 years and adult weight status 24–30 years later.

Design: A longitudinal study with 30 years of follow-up from adolescence (age 13 years in 1976) to adulthood (up to 2000 and 2006). Dietary intake was assessed through cross-check dietary history face-to-face interviews by a dietitian. Beverages were divided into two categories: (i) total SCB and (ii) SCB excluding 100 % fruit juices. Percentage of total fat (%total fat) and percentage of trunk fat (%trunk fat) were obtained through dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements; body weight and height were measured by trained staff.

Setting: Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study, the Netherlands.

Subjects: One hundred and fourteen males and 124 females.

Results: In males, but not in females, each additional daily serving of SCB excluding 100 % fruit juices at 13 years was associated with 1·14 % higher %total fat (95 % CI 0·04, 2·23 %; P = 0·04) and 1·62 % higher %trunk fat (95 % CI 0·14, 3·10 %; P = 0·03) in adulthood after correction for confounders. No statistically significant relationship was found between the intake of SCB excluding 100 % fruit juices at the age of 13 and BMI in both sexes. In addition, no statistically significant relationships were found between the intake of total SCB and all measures of adult weight status in both sexes.

Conclusions: Intake of SCB excluding 100 % fruit juices at the age of 13 years was positively associated with adult %total fat and %trunk fat in males, but not in females.

Read the full article here.